Results tagged ‘ Robinson Cano ’

Waddaya Know…Cano?!

The 2011 MLB Home Run Derby was pretty much a mirror image of all that came before it.  Usually in these things, the first round sees the biggest totals put out, after which the competitors begin to tucker out (especially in the final round).  Not this year.

No player even hit TEN HR’s out of Chase Field in the first round, and the second round was pretty pedestrian as well.  But then, in the final round, both Adrian Gonzalez and Robinson Cano put on quite a show, with Cano ultimately coming out on top.  He had that “pure pull” swing working all night long; looking as if he was doing little more than flicking his wrists to send the ball deep into right field.

Despite the slow start, it was still (as usual) a fun show to watch!

Tonight, Jered Weaver will take the mound for the AL, while Roy “Doc” Halladay will start for the NL in the All-Star Game.

Home Run Derby 2011: Preview

For this year’s Home Run Derby in Arizona, my head tells me not to bet against Jose Bautista…

My heart wants to go with Prince Fielder…

But I almost kind of sense an upset pick in Matt Holliday…

I’m excited to see how it all turns out tomorrow night!

Preview:

AL Squad: Jose Bautista, David Ortiz, Adrian Gonzalez, Robinson Cano

NL Squad: Matt Holliday, Prince Fielder, Matt Kemp, Rickie Weeks

Living Up To The Billing

The 2010 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was billed as a pitchers duel. It started off with these two gentlemen…
0_david-price_opsq-88198-mid.jpg
0_ubaldo-jimenez_opv1-2025-mid.jpg…and didn’t wander too far from the script.

The first run of the game was scored by the AL in the fifth inning on a Robinson Cano sacrifice fly…

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…after Dodger pitcher Hong-Chih Kuo’s throwing error allowed a man to stand on third base.

It wasn’t until the seventh inning when the NL finally began to build a rally, capped off by a bases-clearing single from Brian McCann:

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The American Leaguers didn’t do anything else until the bottom of the ninth, when David Ortiz led off with a single and, with one out, John Buck did likewise.  However, NL right fielder Marlon Byrd nabbed the ball on a hop and fired to second, gunning down the lead-footed Big Papi (and the AL’s serious chance of tying things up):

gallery-ortiz-ap.jpg The obvious game MVP was McCann:

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Matt Capps retired one batter to pick up the win, while Luke Hughes took the lose and Jonathan Broxton recorded the save.

About the only scary moment of the game came when Ryan Braun made a diving catch…

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…and rolled right on top of his wrist.  He came away from the play unscathed, but could have very easily broken his wrist on the play.  Whew!

All in all, the 2010 ASG was a tight, well-played contest, and I was disppointed to hear today that it garnered such poor ratings on FOX.  To me, the ASG is an event I look forward to every summer, and I don’t see why more people don’t get excited about it.  Perhaps in this day and age of round-the-clock media coverage the fans actually need a “break” as much as the players, but not for me, I guess.  I remember watching the game with stars in my eyes as a child, and I still do to this day.

Why We Lost, Theory #2: We Were Overmatched From The Start

yankeesboard06.jpgIn the previous post, I made the point that the Twins have nobody to blame but themselves for the ALDS sweep at the hands of the Yankees. But is this really true?

This is kind of a touchy issue, at least for me, as it implies that the Twins (or any small-market “David” vs. a big-market “Goliath”) really never have much of a chance to compete against the “big boys” of the league.

Any competant baseball fan knows that the economic system of the game is messed up due to the fact that no salary cap is in place.  Teams like the Yankees, Red Sox, and Angels (in the American League) have such a huge advantage over the Twins and Royals of the world that its a wonder any other team ever represents the league in the World Series (I guess that is the crapshoot of a playoff structure that features a 3-of-5 first round).  Sure, Bud Selig’s supposedly brilliant luxury tax system (where, much like Robin Hood, the league robs from the rich to give to the poor) helps a little bit, but in reality all it ends up doing is narrowing the free agent pool each year (as the middle-market teams are able to lock up a few key players to long-term deals).  It most definetly, however, does not prevent teams like the Yankees from nabbing the best free agents year after year (case in point: C.C. Sabathia and A.J. Burnett brought in before the start of this season).  The Twins could never have dreamed of signing guys like that.

Of course, baseball will likely never changed (at least not with Selig at the helm), as the success of the Yanks, Sawx, and Halos fuels the revenue machine, especially in the World Series.  Though it might provide some sanctity back into the game, nobody wants to see the Twins and Athletics, to use two examples, duking it out in the ALCS.  If the MLB execs had it their way, it would be New York and Boston every single year.

The whole situation kind of reminds me of the infamous “You can’t handle the truth” speech from the movie A Few Good Men:

“My existence, while grotesque and incomprehensible to you, saves lives…You don’t want the truth. Because deep down, in places you don’t talk about at parties, you want me on that wall. You need me on that wall.”

While more parity would be great for baseball, it will never happen because admittedly it would weaken the short-term (until new rivalries are formed, at least) revenue stream of the league.

Thus, can the Twins even be expected to compete with the Yankees in any series?  They have Sabathia and Burnett, we have Baker and Blackburn.  They have the best middle of an order (Teixera, A-Rod, Matsui) since Ruth, Gehrig, and Lazzeri batted consecutively, while we have one stud (Mauer) and two others (Kubel, Cuddyer) that are by and large overmatched by quality pitching.  They have guys like Melky Cabrera and Robinson Cano at the BOTTOM of the order, while we have Carlos Gomez, Nick Punto, and Jose Morales because they are all we can afford.  They can throw arms like Joba Chamberlain and Phil Hughes at us, while he have Matt Guerrier and Jose Mijares.  No comparison.

So, those are the two theories as to why our beloved Twins were brutalized by the hated Yanks.  Which one is more valid?  I think it is a mixture of both.  The Twins would need to play a perfect series to even give themselves a chance to beat the Yankees, and instead we choked in every big opportunity.

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